The 100 greatest football moments of all time

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Baggio 1994 penalty

Roberto Baggio misses, 1994 World Cup final

60. USA turn the World Cup on its head

USA 1-0 England, Estadio Independencia
World Cup group stage, 29 June 1950

The moment England may have been taking their first steps in a World Cup but they were doing so with assurance. The “home of football” had actually sat out the first three World Cupsdue to an ongoing row with Fifa. But that hadn’t changed the arrogant presumption that they were still superior to anyone anyway. And, to a degree, the view was justified. The team, after all, was made up of world-renowned players like Stanley Matthews and TomFinney. In the previous years, England had beaten many of the reigning world champions and, just before travelling to Brazil, they had beaten 1938 winners Italy 4-0 and Portugal 10-0. They also won their first ever game at a World Cup, against Chile, 3-1.

By contrast, the patched-together USA team consisted of postmen and high-school teachers. Joe Gatejens was one of three players added to the squad just before the game. Hastily assembled, they had lost their last seven games by an aggregate score of 45-2.

And, as the game got under way, it looked that would be considerably exaggerated. Straight away, England stormed the American goal. By the 12th minute, they had hit the post twice.

Oddly, though, the goal wouldn’t come. And, gradually, the USA grew a bit bolder.

Then, in the 37th minute, Walter Bahr took a shot from distance. And, as goalkeeper Bert Williams moved to claim it, Gaetjens dived headlong to deflect the ball. It only grazed him. But it was enough. USA were ahead. And, despite an English siege, it stayed that way.

They said

“Bloody ridiculous. Can’t we play them again tomorrow?” Wilf Mannion

“Boy, I feel sorry for these bastards. How are they ever going to live down the fact we beat them.” Harry Keough

“It’s been 60 years. It’s taken a lot of forgetting as far as I am concerned.” Bert Williams in 2010

What it meant at that point, the biggest upset in the history of the World Cup bar none. The scales involved meant it was even more unlikely than Cameroon 1990 and North Korea 1966. In terms of that tournament itself, though, its only real impact was in rocking England so that they lost their next game to Spain and went home after the first round. For that World Cup, however, only group winners went through to the final stage. And, in the longer term, it wasn’t quite enough to realign English expectations about the quality of foreign football. That would take another three years.

 

59. Estudiantes begin a new era in just under eight minutes

Estudiantes 4-3 Platense, Estadio Camilo Cichero
Metropolitano Championship, 3 August 1967

The moment By the middle of the 1960s, Argentine football was going through a rather dramatic – and far-reaching – transformation. Old adventure was being replaced by aggression, joyful innocence by an unforgiving order. And that change was best symbolised – and reflected – by provincial side Estudiantes’ incredible comeback against Platense in the semi-final of the Metropolitano.

Indeed, since a side from outside Buenos Aires had never even won a title before, it was an achievement for Estudiantes to even get that far. But it was no fluke. By taking the new win-at-all-costs mentality to its absolute maximum, while also applying a forensic, scientific view to the game and attempting to eke out advantages wherever possible, manager Osvaldo Zubeldia had created a tightly-knit, tough-to-beat machine.

But not on 3 August 1967. Or not in the first half at least. Despite taking the lead after five minutes, Estudiantes were overwhelmed as Platense claimed a 2-1 lead. Worse, immediately after Zubeldia had gathered his team together in the dressing-room at half-time, Bulla scored to make it 3-1. The game looked over.

But Estudiantes only looked at each other. And lifted it. On 53 minutes, Juan Veron cut the deficit. On 59, Bilardo hit an absolute screamer to level the score. Two minutes later, the same player invited a challenge and won a penalty. Madero then converted and won the game.

Platense were too shell shocked to even provide a response. In the dressing-room, Zubedlia showed a very different emotion to half-time: tears of joy. And disbelief. But then he had strengthened the faith.

They said

“Their victory has been a triumph for the new mentality.” El Grafico

“All the possibilities afforded by the game were foreseen and practised. The corners, the free-kicks, throw-ins were used to our best advantage.” Carlos Bilardo

What it meant that Estudiantes became the first side from outside Buenos Aires to win the Metropolitano, as they demolished Racing 3-0 in the final three days later. And, over the next few years, that victory would lead to Estudiantes becoming the first side in history to win the Copa Libertadores three times in a row. By doing so, they would also irrevocably alter the philosophy and outlook of Argentine – and, to an extent, South American – football.

 

58. Sindelar snubs the Nazis

Germany 0-2 Austria, Berlin
Friendly, 3 April 1938

The moment In 1938, it is very arguable that Mattias Sindelar was the greatest player in the world. He was certainly one of the greatest of the preceding decade, the centre-point of the fantastic Austrian ‘Wunderteam’. In the 1934 World Cup, only the hosts Italy had stopped them.

Sadly for Sindelar, it wasn’t the first that the brutal philosophy of fascism would affect his career. Because, in 1938, his country was infamously taken over by the Nazis. While that – of course – had dire consequences far beyond football, it did mean that Austrian football essentially ceased to exist. The fine side of the 30s were incorporated into the German team. So, partly to celebrate the anschluss and partly to bring the two teams together, the regime decided to host a last match between the teams.

There have been many suspicions and conspiracies surrounding the game, one of them being that the Austrians – then a clearly superior team – were ordered to not score against the Germans.

Whatever the truth of that, it was odd that in the first half Sindelar missed a series of chances that he would usually have finished easily. But then he may just have been toying with the Germans. Because, in the second half, he finally knocked in a rebound. And, when his friend Schasti Sesta knocked in a second, Sindelar – an avowed social democrat – did a dance of delight in front of the Swastika-adorned and Nazi-filled directors’ box.

What it meant Embarrassment for the Nazis. And, to an extent, embarrassment for Germany at that same year’s World Cup. Sindelar would repeatedly refuse the overtures to represent the new team. And, while the Germans would then go out in the first round to Switzerland, Sindelar would be censured for refusing to put up Nazi posters in his cafe. A few months later, on the morning of 23 January 1939, he was found dead as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning. Or so the police claimed. The public prosecutor had still not reached a conclusion when the Nazis ordered the case closed six months later.

 

57. North Korea knock out Italy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mqp3Xa5IR_I

North Korea 1-0 Italy, Ayresome Park
World Cup group stage, 19 July 1966

The moment As the Italians took to the pitch for their final group game of the 1966 World Cup, they knew a point would do them. Although they themselves had just lost to a strong USSR team, Chile had slipped up badly by conceding a shock 88th-minute equaliser to lowly North Korea.

And since it was the Asians that the Italians were playing in their final game, they could feel confident. North Korea had only qualified for the World Cup because all other African, Asian and Oceanic nations other than Australia had boycotted the tournament in protest at the fact Fifa had only given them one place. And, on the pitch itself, their average height was five-foot-five: something which proved a real problem against the imposing Russians.

Initially, it seemed to be the same story against the Italians. The Europeans absolutely dominated the opening stages and should have been at least 3-0 ahead. Shortly before half-time, though, they went a man down. Captain Giacomo Bulgarelli went off injured after he himself had fouled a Korean player.

And, in the 41st minute, they were a goal down. Pak Do Ik blasted an unstoppable shot past Enrico Albertosi. Ayresome Park, which had effectively adopted the North Koreans as its home team, erupted.

They said

“I urge you to win one or two matches.” The ‘Great Leader’ Kim Il-Sung before the team departed.

“It was the day I learnt football is not all about winning. When I scored that goal the people of Middlesbrough took us to their hearts.” Scorer – and winner – Pak Do Ik

“I have had to go through my whole life with this burden of Korea.” Italian manager Edmondo Fabbri

“Death to Fabbri” Graffiti seen around Rome after the defeat, accompanied by a picture of a man in a noose

What it meant That North Korea became the most unlikely World Cup quarter-finalists of all time. As a result, Italy were pelted with tomatoes on their return. And the incident epitomised the four-time World Cup winners’ often odd, idiosyncratic relationship with international football. In the immediate future, though, it would prove a positive for international football. Of the 66 squad, only Albertosi, Giacinto Facchetti, Gianni Rovera and Sandro Mazzola were spared. And, with an otherwise brand new team, Italy would go on to win Euro 68 and reach the final of the next World Cup.

Similar moments that didn’t make it South Korea knock out Italy 2002

 

56. Ajax take Total Football to completion

Ajax 2-0 Inter, De Kuip
European Cup final, 31 May 1972

The moment In an absolutely devastating display, a thoroughly modern, dynamic Ajax completely unravel a defensive, anachronistic Inter. Indeed, the eventual 2-0 scoreline should be sued for libel.

At times, Ajax seemed to be experimenting with the very limits of the sport. And, as if to confirm the fact that Ajax were so embarrassingly far ahead of the Italians, Johan Cruyff even scored with his head. That may have been a rare occurrence. But, with Cruyff hitting both goals, there was no more appropriate scorer to symbolise the team’s crowning moment.

They said

“It was confirmation that at that time the Dutch football was on the level above a lot of others.” Cruyff

What it meant coming in the second year of Ajax’s three-in-a-row and the only one in which the European Cup was part of a treble, the victory represented the absolute peak of Total Football.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Spain 1-0 Germany, Euro 2008

 

55. Il Grande Torino score six in the first 19 minutes against Roma

Roma 0-7 Torino, Stadio Olimpico
Serie A, 28 April 1946

The moment Throughout the 1940s, a great Torino side had enraptured Italian football with the excellence of their attacking play and the four successive titles it brought. They still hold the record for the most goals scored in a Serie A campaign – 125 in the 40 games of the 1947-48 season – and, in terms of goals-per-game, have the three best averages in the history of the competition.

The very peak of this period, however, came in April 1946. In the ultimate emphasis of their overwhelming football, Torino hit six goals in the first 19 minutes. Whatever about their ratio of three goals a game, this was a goal every three minutes.

What it meant For Roma, utter humiliation. At half-time, Torino manager Luigi Ferrero even told his players that there was no need to humiliate the opposition further. The job was done. The performance would play a key part in the legend of Torino, which was so tragically – and prematurely – ended in the Superga air crash of 1949.

 

54. Djukic pays the penalty

Deportivo La Coruna 0-0 Valencia, Riazor
Spanish league, 14 May 1994

The moment Deportivo’s entire season – and indeed history – had been leading up this moment. Without a single league title in their trophy cabinet, they led the table for the vast majority of the 1993-94 campaign. A resurgent Barcelona had done superbly to reel them in but, by the last day, Deportivo were still a point ahead and only needed to beat a mediocre Valencia to secure a maiden victory.

Except, as the clock reached the 89th minute, Depor still hadn’t scored. Worse, Barca’s “dream team” had slaughtered Sevilla 5-2. Going on head-to-head record, the Catalans were back on top of the league.

As such, Deportivo simply had to score.

Finally, moments from the end, they got their chance. As full-back Nando stormed into the box, he was tripped by Francisco Camarasa.

Penalty. And potential deliverance.

But also a dilemma.

Depor’s regular penalty-taker Donato had already gone off. And Bebeto – notoriously – refused to take it.

Up stepped defender Miroslav Djukic. But he didn’t look comfortably. After breathing in very deeply, the defender began a stilted run-up… and struck the ball feebly into the arms of Jose Gonzalez.

They said

“You’ve sold out.” Bebeto’s reported comments to the Valencia players throughout the game, which was ironic because it later emerged Barcelona actually paid Valencia a “bonus” to lift their game

“Bebeto didn’t have confidence because he had recently missed against Oviedo and Aston Villa. I hit them usually… the next up was Djukic.” Donato

What it meant never has an entire championship come down to one, isolated moment. A single, distilled kick. Not even Michael Thomas against Arsenal. In that, it was truly unique.

Djukic’s miss meant Deportivo would have to wait another six years for a title. But, the obvious element of winning a league a title aside, it was arguably just as significant for Barca. By lifting the 1994 trophy, the Catalans won the only four-in-a-row in their history – an important feat given how often Real had done it. As such, the legacy of the Dream Team was only enhanced.

 

53. Did it cross the line?

England 4-2 West Germany, Wembley
World Cup final, 30 July 1966

The moment Initially, it had seemed like England were going to be denied by the tightest of margins. Exhausted and desperately hanging on, their defence suddenly ceded in the 89th minute of normal time to allow a West German equaliser for Wolfgang Weber.

Ultimately, though, it would prove a game of inches in another way. In the 11th minute of extra-time, Geoff Hurst turned and rapidly released a snapshot. The ball bounced off the bar and down off the line. With the ball headed away by Weber, play stopped. And so, seemingly, did time.

Swiss referee Gottfried Dienst was uncertain whether the ball had crossed the line and went to consult his Soviet linesman Tofik Bakhtamov. Except, with no common language between the two, all they could do was dramatically gesticulate. And, crucially, Bakhtamov signalled that it had crossed the line.

They said

“The linesman said the ball was in, so that was that. I’m not bitter.” Sepp Maier surprisingly sums up the feelings of the West German team

“The ball never crossed the line.” Hurst, 2010

What it meant That England’s lead was – perhaps unfairly – restored as they went on to raise the trophy itself. In the longer term, though, the “goal” would become a touchstone for contentious incidents. In Germany, the phrase “Wembley-Tor” entered the football vernacular to describe similarly dubious strikes. It also remains one of the great arguments for video evidence.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Luis Garcia v Chelsea, 2005; Lampard v Germany 2010

 

52. Iniesta decides it for Dani

Netherlands 0-1 Spain, Soccer City
World Cup final, 11 July 2010

The moment Spain were waiting a lot longer for a World Cup than the 116 minutes leading up to Cesc Fabregas’s pass. There were also 80 years of failure which – despite the Euro 2008 win – threatened to rise up again after a tournament that had seen a lot of frustration, anxiety, grit and endurance.

With opposition teams realising that the only real way to counter Spain’s possession game was to aggressively close out space near goal, the Dutch took that approach to an extreme.

Throughout the 120 minutes, Spain’s technicians were constantly tested, tackled and simply fouled. To their credit – and to the horror of purists like Johan Cruyff – the Dutch did manage to suck the Spanish into a petty, petulant, niggly battle.

Until, eventually, Holland got the red card their roughhousing deserved. Suddenly Spain had sufficient space to spray the ball around in. And Fabregas exploited it. The Arsenal playmaker fed Andres Iniesta and, with the ball sitting up perfectly, the midfielder despatched it into the far corner. In the explosion of joy that followed, Ineista whipped off his jersey to reveal a message to his departed teammate: “Dani Jarque: always with us.”

They said

“It was like it was in slow motion. I could hear the silence. But I knew that ball was going in.” Iniesta

“Today is a reward for beautiful football.” Vicente Del Bosque

“Regrettably, sadly, [Holland] played very dirty… yes it served to unsettle Spain. If with this they got satisfaction, fine. But they ended up losing. They were playing anti-football.” Johan Cruyff

“The best team won. I am disappointed.” Bert van Marwijk

What it meant With just four minutes of extra-time remaining, Iniesta’s strike was the latest winner the World Cup had ever seen. But that in itself was proof of the merit of Spain’s possession game. Having only scored three goals in three knock-out games, they were often castigated for not having a Plan B. The point of Plan A, however, was to eventually exhaust the opposition to the point an opening would present itself. And, since this approach was most important against sides so willing to close up as Holland, the win also represented something of a victory in the apparent duel of styles then dominating the game: proactive against reactive football. In victory, Spain were vindicated. Technique had won.

On a human level, though, Iniesta’s celebration also illustrated the very best of the game. At the moment of his greatest achievement, the Spaniard made sure to selflessly turn attention to his tragic, departed friend.

 

51. Baggio raises the bar… and then aims too high

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldY502gnb0E

Brazil 0-0 Italy, Rose Bowl
World Cup final, 17 July 1994

The moment The pressure was on Roberto Baggio. But he was surely able to handle it. After all, he had essentially carried Italy as far as the penalty shoot-out in the World Cup final. It’s eminently fair to say they would have got nowhere near so far without him. Indeed, they mightn’t have got past the last 16. In three previous knock-out games, the pony-tailed playmaker scored five of Italy’s six goals and all of them were crucial. As such, even though he was unfit going into the final, Arrigo Sacchi couldn’t afford to not play him against a highly functional Brazil who also had the fantasy of Romario and Bebeto.

On the day, though, none of the forwards could find an opening. And it was left to penalties. First off, Marcio Santos and Franco Baresi exchanged misses before Daniele Massaro missed the first in six. It was left to Baggio to keep Italy in contention. But, for probably the first time in the competition, he failed.

They said

“I knew Taffarel always dived so I decided to shoot for the middle, about halfway up… it was an intelligent decision because Taffarel did go to his left. Unfortunately – and I don’t know how – the ball flew over the crossbar. I was knackered. But I was the team’s penalty taker. I’ve never run away from my responsibilities.” Baggio

“It affected me for years. It was the worst moment of my career. I still dream about it.” Baggio

What it meant that was Brazil – and Romario’s tournament – rather than Baggio’s. The South Americans also won their first tournament since 1970. And, in that sense, the minimalist manner of the shoot-out victory seemed apt. Because this Brazilian side received such criticism for playing a style of football at a far remove from the brilliance of 1970. Like with Ronaldo four years later, meanwhile, it would Baggio a long time to properly recover.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Platini and Zico miss, 1986

 

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96 comments
FrankLovett
FrankLovett

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FrankLovett

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mink
mink

Gerrie Muhren 1973 Real Madrid-Ajax 0-1 "keepie-uppie"

 

thefootballfan
thefootballfan

u missed bulgaria win over germany in the world cup.

thefootballfan
thefootballfan

what about did it cross the line this time for england

ApoorvGupta
ApoorvGupta

I expected to see a list of the best players in the world for the previous year, as you made one last year. I hope you find the time to make it this year too. I love going through the lists and tell all my friends about this site too.

JordanPratt1
JordanPratt1

@ConnaB Okay then I'll get started then :P

Ewan MacKenna
Ewan MacKenna

Pat Devlin asks aspiring journalist during after-match interview if he had stuck his fingers in a socket for instance?

Football Pantheon
Football Pantheon

We were thinking that would become an issue. We had to stay true to our formula.system though, and that scored low on influence, quality etc... Think about it another way... would it feel so high-profile if it was from a fourth tier from outside England? Plus, Carlisle got relegated two years later.

Alex Cooper
Alex Cooper

Presumably a typo (or two!) No. 2 Maradona, does not add up to 23!

Shakir Choudhury
Shakir Choudhury

Jimmy Glass' extra time winner to save Carlisle United from conference football......

Daniel Collins
Daniel Collins

Two big one's missing for me: -David May stealing the limelight on the podium after the '99 CL final. -Liam Coyle leaving Carles Puyol on his arse when Derry City played Barcelona at the Brandywell in 2003.

NathanBarnes
NathanBarnes

How about Arsenal's unbeaten run? Just saying..

Manicowl
Manicowl

I'm surprised the match between Red Star Belgrade and Dynamo Zagreb that we're told started the war in the Balkans isn't in there, or would that be classed in the same vein as Heysel, Hillsborough etc...?

adamrhbrown
adamrhbrown

And so, we come to this list. Well...hmmm. Difficult to say really. What makes a great moment is very much more difficult to analyse than the other categories established so far. For what it's worth, I feel that the word needs a stricter definition than what applies here. I mentioned in my email to you that I think a 'moment' should be no more than 5 mins tops, and even that might be overstating it.

Using The Times' Wish You Were There moments as a guide, I have drafted up a list of what I believe to be the 50 Most Iconic English Football TV Events, a word that I feel works better when you want to measure whole matches (or even campaigns) against isolated incidents - as well as acknowledging the influence of broadcasting. On that basis I can't disagree with much of your selection here, though I cannot fathom why such high rankings are bestowed upon each episode of Mourinho and Barca's tit-for-tat just yet.

Also, let me just clarify how surreal as an English fan it is to see Stan Collymore above "They think it's all over" and beg you to reconsider, simply because we cannot afford him to actually see that!

I also strongly disagree with ranking Bergkamp so high. Obviously the goal is of the highest quality, but how can the even more extraordinary - as well as more iconic and more influential - contributions of Cantona, Tardelli and Zidane rank so far down the list in comparison? (I'm not trying to glorify violence, by the way. Just those two examples.)

Re that goal though, I recently came across a New York Times blog post from the 2006 World Cup, reflecting on previous Argentina/Holland games. Although mostly about the 1978 final, Bergkamp's goal obviously gets a mention. Scrolling down to the comments, it amused me greatly to find the first one by an American sports fan, suitably unimpressed! (Though, to be fair, considerably more of his countrymen jumped in to disassociate themselves from such a remark.)

Last thing for now - Maradona's goals vs England should be one entry. The contrast is the real story - an apt metaphor for both the man and the wider culture of his homeland. Plus it just about squeezes into my five minute limit. (Alright, make it 10, then Liverpool's bizarre comeback can still be included as well.)

Meerkat
Meerkat

Fascinating as always. The major omissions for me would be Heysel, Munich, Superga (although these were more 'important' than 'great') and Jimmy Glass '99.I do wish there were more actual "moments" than summaries of important matches, particularly in the top 50. I'd also like to see more moments that transcend football on the pitch alone; for example, Kepto and Gun: in the era of fanzines, phone-ins, supporters' clubs and Fever Pitch, it was clear fans had a voice and influence on the game (of varying levels)...this story (that it was fictitious is irrelevant) and the reaction to it showed how football is universal and can bring anyone together.I don't see why there are 2 moments of the Mourinho vs Barca saga; can these not be distilled into one? Pick the most important and lasting, include a summary of the other? Nice read though

PadraigOHooligan
PadraigOHooligan

A great list. I of course disagree with the placing of many things. For one I would have had Van Basten's goal and the Cruyff turn higher as actual moments, but that's the point of this, a great read. I can't think of any major omissions as of yet but I will return and whinge about something that pops into my head later, you can be sure.

It puts me in mind of the Orbis World Cup 90 Collection binder which was my first introduction to a lot of the moments on the list.

footballistico
footballistico

Great site. No place to include Thuram's two goals against Croatia (world cup 1998 semi-final ) ? It's a good example of an event transcending a player.

Miguel Delaney
Miguel Delaney

It was truly brilliant. But our shortlist ran to the hundreds. Many great moments missed out. What, for example, would you take out to put it in?

jimm1y
jimm1y

great list, iv only 1 problem. you never used jimmy magee's commentary for the maradona goal!

Big Fat Ronaldo
Big Fat Ronaldo

There must be a place for this. Kanu (ex-Inter Milan, Ajax and Arsenal) extraordinary last minute equaliser versus Brazil in the 1996 Olympic semi-final.

In a crowded last minute six yard box, with his team 2-3 down, he flicks the ball up with his back to goal and chips it over the Dida, in one movement

Nigeria was 3-1 down at half time at one stage, Brazil had a clear goal disallowed that would have made it 4-1, Nigeria missed a penalty while it was 3-1, and Kanu eventually scored a sensational Golden Goal to end it in extra time, completely dumbfooling the Brazilian defence before smashing home from 18yards

All this happened before without me mentioning the sheer beauty, and incredible exhibition of skilled and attacking football from both sides.....for the Brazilian team had - Ronaldo da Lima ( one month before THE INCREDIBLE 96/97 season at Barcelona), Rivaldo, Bebeto, Roberto Carlos, the maestro Juninho in his pomp, Flavio Conceiao (Real Madrid), Ze Elias, the great centre back Aldair and Dida in goal.

This set the stage for Nigeria's equally pulsating and dramatic final against the Argentina team, which had - Hernan Crespo, Mattias Almeyda, Diego Simeone, Javier Zanetti, Roberto Ayala, Nestor Sensini, Ariel Ortega, Claudio Lopez,Jose Chamot

Nigeria went behind 5times in both semi final and final and still won the tournament

The Nigeria Brazil game also made it into World Soccer Magazine's 50 greatest matches of all time

And before this, had any team outside Europe or South America won an an International Football tournament??? I doubt

It also inspired the Nigerian national team to record momentous victories over Spain and Bulgaria at France 1998 World Cup, and the Cameroun team to retain the Olympic Football title in 2000 for Africa

It deserves an inclusion

Football Pantheon
Football Pantheon

We were thinking that would become an issue. We had to stay true to our formula.system though, and that scored low on influence, quality etc... Think about it another way... would it feel so high-profile if it was from a fourth tier from outside England? Plus, Carlisle got relegated two years later.

adamabyss
adamabyss

You had better revise this to include Henry's return goal at Arsenal tonight. Absolutely incredible, unprecedented emotional scenes.

MDelaneyST
MDelaneyST moderator

@Meerkat Cheers as ever. The reason we didn't include Heysel, Hillsborough, Munich or Superga is because we didn't want to trivialise or be flippant about tragedies (by including them in such a list in the first place), and we also wanted this to mostly be a 'celebration' of the game, so made a conscious decision to leave such terrible incidents.Re the likes of Fever Pitch, they're simply too hard to quantify. And, again, that's not really the style we were going for. With respect, you're also the first person to suggest that!As for Glass, well the reason it's not included is because it scored low in a few categories (not nature obviously). It didn't really have an influence on the game and, mostly, Carlisle were relegated within a few years!

As for two moments from the Mourinho-Barca saga, well the fact is they were important even apart from the saga: one set the tactical template of the game, the other was one of the landmark, all-time performances.But cheers again! All feedback is welcome!

Meerkat
Meerkat

I'm also not sure how to format comments so paragraph spaces aren't deleted on publication?

adamrhbrown
adamrhbrown

@Meerkat You can't have genuine tragedies on a list of great moments! I would however nominate the rendition of You'll Never Walk Alone before the 1989 FA Cup final (or - as mentioned in the relevant entry - the one performed by AC Milan and Real Madrid fans in that semi final).

MDelaneyST
MDelaneyST moderator

@BenjaminBildeBoelsmand Pearce isn't a bad shout but, consider this: in the 'global game', Baggio's goal against Chile was possibly bigger if we're going to go along those lines. It was his first World Cup game since the miss against Brazil (which, most of all, settled an actual World Cup) and, moreover, he was a much bigger name than Pearce.As for Glass, well the reason it's not included is because it scored low in a few categories (not nature obviously). It didn't really have an influence on the game and, mostly, Carlisle were relegated within a few years!I know what you're saying about the game being at its purest, but it can hardly be described as the game at its "finest"!

Quality, after all, had to be one of our considerations!

adamrhbrown
adamrhbrown

@PadraigOHooligan Yes, I too was surprised to see that anyone would rank Bergkamp ahead of his two countrymen, great goal that it is, especially as Cruyff's turn has come to signify something even beyond the player's abilities. If it's been judged so favourably just because it happened in the last minute I'd say Michael Thomas, Jimmy Glass, and Man Utd vs Bayern all easily beat it for pure drama - and they actually settled the outcomes of whole seasons, not one inconsequential quarter final match.

adamabyss
adamabyss

@footballistico good suggestion. I believe they were the only two goals he ever scored for France. Don't you mean a player transcending an event?

MDelaneyST
MDelaneyST moderator

@adamabyss Well, let's not go nuts! It wouldn't score highly in too many of our criteria like "importance", "impact on history" (although we wouldn't know that for a while).

Golden Ball
Golden Ball

 @MDelaneyST  @Meerkat good decision not to include Hillsborough, Heysel and Munich. Just wondering why King Kennys winner against Brugge in 78 wasnt included. It was significant. Cheers!

Golden Ball
Golden Ball

 @adamrhbrown  @Meerkat The replay against Forest could have been Included as well. And speaking about Liverpool...The 88 season game against Forest, the 5-0 demolition was huge.

BenjaminBildeBoelsmand
BenjaminBildeBoelsmand

@MDelaneyST@BenjaminBildeBoelsmand I probably agree with you on Baggio, even though the screams of Pearce have me in tears every time (and as a dane it's not the national emotions). And with Glass I must respectfully disagree with the decision. To me, it's what football is about.

Once again thanks for the fantastic work you do!

adamabyss
adamabyss

@MDelaneyST It was his 227th goal for them though - a goal that no one ever thought would be scored. And just a few weeks after they unveiled a statue of him. Isn't it even supposed to be bad luck to have a statue of yourself erected while you are still alive (or maybe that's street names, haha)? Evidently it wasn't unlucky for him! He's had a pretty historical impact on the world game though, he was the best player in the world for a couple of years and this is the latest (last?) chapter. Night.