The 100 greatest football moments of all time

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Denmark 1992 European Champions

Denmark celebrate Kim Vilfort's goal against Germany, Euro 92

80. Meazza hurts Spain

Italy 1-0 Spain, Stadio Giovanni Berta
World Cup quarter-final replay, 1 June 1934

The moment Under the watchful eye of the Fascist regime in 1934, the Italian players probably felt an element of intimidation. But not as much as the Spanish players in this replayed World Cup quarter-final.

In the first game, Giovanni Ferrari had scored Italy’s equaliser after Angelo Schiavo supposedly thumped goalkeeper Ricardo Zamora. Thereafter, the Italians apparently went about picking out and kicking the rest of their targets, leaving three Spanish players – including the great Zamora – unable to play the following day.

And, just 11 minutes into the next game, there would be another collision between striker and goalkeeper. Meazza apparently barged into replacement Juan Jose Nogues to head home Raimundo Orsi’s header.

This time ahead, Italy would repeat the same tactics for the rest of the game, bullying Spain out of it. Just like in the first leg, too, a Spanish goal would be controversially disallowed.

They said

“The Spanish players were playing practically on crutches.” ABC

What it meant That Italy would go on to win their first of two successive World Cups, with Benito Mussolini proudly watching one of the greatest international sides of all time. Given the circumstances of the match, however – not least the fact both of the referees involved were immediately suspended by their federations – it would fuel suspicion of the exact extent of the Fascist government’s influence on that team.

On a more innocent level, the winning goal would only add to Guiseppe Meazza’s growing, heroic image. Spain would also begin to develop a complex about Italy’s supposedly suspect ways that would last for another 74 years.

Similar moments that didn’t make it England beat Argentina, 1966; Argentina beat Peru, 1978

 

79. Liam Brady steps up before stepping away

Catanzaro 0-1 Juventus, Stadio Comunale
Serie A, 16 May 1982

The moment There are 10 minutes of the 1981-82 Italian season left. Not only are Fiorentina and Juventus level on points after an emotional season, but they’re level at 0-0 in their games away to Cagliari and Catanzaro respectively.

Already, Catanzaro have been denied a penalty. A play-off seems inevitable. Until, another apparent inevitability takes hold.

Suddenly, a Catanzaro defender handles in the box. Penalty to Juventus.
Up steps Liam Brady.

He knows this penalty kick could seal a second consecutive title for Giovanni Trapattoni’s team and cruelly deny Fiorentina their first in 13 years.

He also knows, however, that this could be his last ever kick for the club. Just three weeks before the Catanzaro game, Brady had been informed by an agent that he would be replaced by Michel Platini the following season – a victim of Italy’s foreigner rule and the Frenchman’s fantastic form.

On the day though, it was Fiorentina who would feel like victims. Because Brady would coolly score, amid all manner of recriminations from Florence.

They said

“Since then I have this reputation in Italy as the ultimate pro. I didn’t deserve it, but I got it.” Brady

“They have stolen our championship.” Fiorentina captain Giancarlo Antognoni

What it meant Brady would leave Juventus with a perfect parting gift in the club’s record 20th title. Fiorentina, however, would never forget the feeling of robbery. Nor the feelings of hatred. It was that day that really gave rise to a rancorous rivalry between the two clubs, as well as the infamous anti-Juve phrase “we would rather be second than thieves”.

Platini, interestingly, couldn’t help Juve retain the title the following season. But he would eventually help them conquer Europe. Brady, as he states himself, would come to personify selfless professionalism.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Maurizio Turone’s disallowed goal for Roma against Juventuus, 10 May 1981

 

78. Denmark win Euro 92

Denmark 2-0 Germany, Ullevi Stadium
Euro 92 final, 26 June 1992

The moment No-one gave the Danes a chance. But then that was no different to any other point in the tournament.

The Danes had already overcome the fact that they hadn’t actually qualified (only instated after the dissolution of Yugoslavia), the fact they only won one of their three group games, and then the dynamic defending champions Holland. Surely, though, they would see their luck balance out against West Germany?

Except, having built their campaign on a diligent backline – as opposed to the kind of attacking talent that typified the 80s side – Denmark somehow kept out a German onslaught. And, as if to emphasise the unlikely nature of the tournament, John Jensen hit the key opener. Ten minutes from the end, Kim Vilfort sealed a sensational victory.

They said

“The mood was that we would go and play the three games and try our best but we did not have a chance of winning the whole tournament – that was the feeling of the players.” Jensen

“We still don’t understand what we have done.” Peter Schmeichel

“There was no pressure on us at all, we could relax and just go out and play.” Jensen

What it meant At that point, that non-qualifiers Denmark were the most unlikely winners of any international tournament in history.

They would eventually be relieved of that status in the same competition 12 years later, but the victory did herald forthcoming shifts in international football.

At the least, Denmark’s win did challenge many existing assumptions about international football. A far superior Danish side had got nowhere near such heights in the 80s while far better prepared teams had performed much worse in Euro 92 itself. Many of the Danish players weren’t even fully fit. With the pressure off, however, the team produced. Certainly, the team had been the benchmark for any mid-tier sides aiming for a surprise… until 2004 that is.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Colombia win the Copa America 2001

 

77. Ronaldo’s “grande ruberia” – “the big thievery”

Juventus 1-0 Inter, Stadio delle Alpi
Serie A, 26 April 1998

The moment Ronaldo is bearing down on goal. And, as ever, he’s causing chaos, consternation and panic. The striker has been in absolutely rampant form all season and might yet settle the destination of the Italian title.

There are 21 minutes left of the key game between Juventus and Inter and, although the home side are one goal ahead in the match and one point ahead in the title race, they’re badly struggling with the Brazilian. At one point, Ronaldo has six Juventus players chasing him only to be desperately, drastically crowded. If Inter can win they’ll be two points clear.

But, suddenly – after Ronaldo has sashayed his way into the Juve box again – Mark Iuliano bundles him over. It seems a clear penalty… to everyone except the referee Piero Ceccarini.

He waves away the appeals and, almost immediately, Juve go up the other end. Now, Alessandro Del Piero goes down.

This time it is a penalty. The Inter players go wild, chasing the referee all over the pitch. Manager Gigi Simone is sent off.

Juve actually miss the penalty. But still close out the game and, eventually, the title race.

They said

“You should be ashamed.” Inter manager Gigi Simoni screams at referee Piero Ceccarini

“I watched replays the following day. I made a mistake.” Ceccarini, in 2009

“It’s too late now… The Scudetto would have been ours had we won in Turin because we had just four easy matches left.” Simoni in 2009

“I was massacred. My son was 16 years old at the time and it was not easy for him.” Ceccarini

What it meant That Juventus won yet another title in contentious, controversial circumstances. But this result would also come to symbolise a period in which Juve’s achievements came under deep suspicion – first through Zdenek Zeman’s accusations of doping then, eventually, through Calciopoli.

It would take the latter – and another seven years – for Inter to finally lift the Scudetto again.

 

76. Santos go from the ridiculous to the sublime

Santos 3-0 Penarol, Estadio Monumental, Buenos Aires
Copa Libertadores final play-off, 30 September 1962

The moment Amazing to think it now but Pele’s Santos were almost an afterthought going into only the third ever Copa Libertadores final.

At that point, formidable Uruguayan side Penarol had won the first two versions of the then suspiciously-viewed competition. Moreover, it didn’t look like Pele would be fit for the final at all. And, by the time it started, things just got better for the Uruguayans. Legendary striker Alberto Spencer fired Penarol into an early lead.

But, thanks to the quality of Coutinho, Santos claimed what was then an unlikely 2-1 win. Until events took an even more unexpected turn.

In Brazil, Penarol initially justified their label as favourites by going into a 3-2 lead to make it 5-5 on aggregate. But, with Santos fans hurling objects onto the pitch after Spencer had hit the equaliser, Chilean referee Carlos Robles decided to take the players off the pitch. After eventually bringing them back on an hour later, Pagao then hit a winner for Santos. Or so he thought.

According to the official rules of the competition, Robles had inadvertently ended the match by hauling the players off. So, a decider in Argentina was called for. As, crucially, was a now fully-fit Pele.

It was finally time for Santos to show their true quality. And they did so in emphatic fashion. After Omar Caetano scored an own goal to give Santos the lead, Pele lifted them to even greater heights with two goals.

They said

“We made our way down to the dressing room and started celebrating… But then, the following day, we found out that the referee had officially ended the game when he took the players off… We had to go and play a third game on a neutral ground. It was a massive blow for us.”

What it meant The epic narrative that truly launched the Copa Libertadores, not to mention the legend of Santos.

 

75. The Panenka chip

Czechoslovakia 2-2 West Germany, Crvena Zvezda Stadium
Euro 76 final, 20 June 1976

The moment Czechoslovakia stood on the brink of a particularly brilliant victory. Since Uli Hoeness had just ballooned West Germany’s third penalty over the bar, all Antonin Panenka had to do was slot home this last spot-kick. Except, you could have forgiven him for feeling some pressure. The Czechoslovakians, after all, had already squandered an even more commanding lead. Having led 2-0 after 25 minutes, they immediately let the redoubtable Germans back in through Dieter Muller’s strike before Bernd Holzenbein equalised in the 89th minute. If anyone could still wrestle a victory out of such a situation, it was the defending champions.

Not that you would have thought any of this weighed on Panenka. He effortlessly and irreverently chipped the ball into the centre of the goal, completely outfoxing the great Sepp Maier.

They said

“If it were patentable, I’d have it patented.” Panenka

“He’s a poet.” A L’Equipe journalist

“I eventually realised the goalkeeper always waits until the just before the last moment to try and anticipate. I decided it was probably easier to score by feinting to shoot and then just gently tapping the ball into the middle of the goal… It worked so well that I decided I would use the technique if I got a penalty at the European Championships. Of course, it was pure chance that the opportunity came when it did.” Panenka

What it meant that Czechoslovakia were the champions of Europe having won the first ever shootout in an international tournament. They also set the standard for any future kicker audacious enough to try something different. Moreover, the win prevented West Germany becoming the only team in history to win three major tournaments in a row.

 

74. La Maquina’s crowning moment

Boca Juniors 2-2 River Plate, La Bombonera
Argentine league, 8 November 1942

The moment Through the early ’40s, one of the finest sides in River Plate’s history – not to mention South America’s – had thrilled Argentine football. Known as La Maquina – “the machine” – their football was extraordinarily pure. But far from perfect. Foreshadowing many similar teams of the future, they were known as “the Knights of Anguish” because of the manner they utterly dominated games but didn’t necessarily decide them. Juan Carlos Munoz – one of the famed front five also consisting of Felix Loustau, Angel Labruna, Adolfo Pedernera and Jose Moreno – laughed that “generally, it took a long time for the goal to come”.

And so it proved in the final Superclasico of the 1942 season, where a point would have given Rover the title.

Clearly energised by the awful prospect of their eternal rivals winning the league on their patch, Boca Juniors raced into a two-goal lead. But, as ever, River found a response. This time through Pedernera who hit twice to score 25 goals in 25 games and seal the title.

What it meant the final formation of La Maquina, with new arrival Loustau winning his first medal with the team.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Maradona goal v River Plate, 1981

 

73. Cameroon shatter Argentina… and then shock them

Argentina 0-1 Cameroon, San Siro
World Cup Group B, 8 June 1990

The moment You could forgive Cameroon feeling intimidated. After all, amid the global, piercing exposure of playing the first game of the World Cup, they were up against the defending champions and the greatest player in the world in Diego Maradona.

As such, a little anxiety was to be expected. But not quite that level of aggression. Cameroon quickly cut the gap between the two teams by cutting the Argentines down to size – not least Claudio Caniggia.

And, having eventually risen to the challenge, the Africans soon rose above Argentina – specifically Francois Omam Biyick. In the 67th minute, he met a Cameroon corner to squirm in the only goal of the game. The champions, despite so many advantages – including an extra two men on the pitch – were beaten.

They said

“I was very comfortable until they scored.” Maradona

“Without doubt the worst defeat of my career.” Carlos Bilardo

“Our humility and the seriousness of our players – and the fact we still consider soccer just a game.” Omam Biyick on why Cameroon won

What it meant The first point at which the world turned. For a start, after the relatively open international era of the ’80s, Cameroon’s brutal tackling signalled the horribly cynical World Cup that was to come.

And yet, despite being reduced to nine men, they still overcame Argentina. Not only was it the first ever victory at a World Cup for a sub-Saharan African team but it was the first time the defending champions had lost their opening game.

International football, it seemed, was no longer such a sure thing. Not least because Cameroon would then upset expectations altogether and come within a hair’s breadth of the last four.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Roger Milla embarrasses Rene Higuita; Greece beat Portugal in the opening game of Euro 2004

 

72. Carlos Alberto’s pass… and Bank’s save

Brazil 1-0 England, Estadio Jalisco
World Cup Group 3, 7 June 1970

The moment What’s often forgotten is the piece of wonder that precedes it. Showcasing the kind of outrageous quality that would seem commonplace among the Brazilians by the time the tournament ended, right-back Carlos Alberto curves an exquisite ball around Terry Cooper with the outside of his boot. At full speed, Jairzinho surges onto it before clipping a perfect cross over for Pele. The number-10 powers the ball in… only for Gordon Banks to somehow get his arm behind it and then improbably turn it over the bar.

They said

“You could have caught it.” Alan Mullery to Banks immediately afterwards

What it meant In terms of the World Cup itself, very little. Banks, after all, could do nothing about Jairzinho’s winner. But the sheer amount of high-end moments in the match – not least this sequence – marks it as a milestone. And, although there have been better saves since then and arguably before, the stage it took place on (not to mention the technicolor it took place in) ensured it set a benchmark for goalkeepers.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Jim Montgomery for Sunderland in the 1973 FA Cup final; Dudek denies Shevchenko 2005

 

71. Grosso’s late great show

Germany 0-2 Italy, Westfalonstadion
World Cup semi-final, 4 July 2006

The moment Both Italy and Germany had overcome a lot of controversy and emotion to come this far. And, incredibly, this semi-final had even more… except, that was, for a goal. For 119 of the 120 minutes, the two sides raged and rampaged up the field with Italy just about edging the encounter. Indeed, by the time Alessandro Del Piero stepped up to hit a late corner, they could genuinely feel aggrieved – and anxious – at not having taken a series of late chances.

After 24 years without a trophy, a last-minute denial in Euro 2000 and a series of embarrassments in that time, the pressure – it seemed – was building to a similar point for Italy as in 1982.

Just like Marco Tardelli, though, Fabio Grosso would provide a release. And in exquisite fashion.

As Andrea Pirlo collected Del Piero’s corner, time almost seemed to pause. The midfielder then casually – but precisely – picked out Grosso, who swept the ball home in one magnificent movement.

They said

“It’s extremely gratifying, because we deserved to win. It’s quite simple: we dominated the game for long spells.” Marcello Lippi

What it meant Judging from Grosso’s Tardelli-style reaction, an awful lot. Italy reached their first World Cup final in 12 years and, finally, looked favourites to lift the trophy. Moreover, it was an uplifting ending to an exhilarating game.

 

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96 comments
FrankLovett
FrankLovett

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mink
mink

Gerrie Muhren 1973 Real Madrid-Ajax 0-1 "keepie-uppie"

 

thefootballfan
thefootballfan

u missed bulgaria win over germany in the world cup.

thefootballfan
thefootballfan

what about did it cross the line this time for england

ApoorvGupta
ApoorvGupta

I expected to see a list of the best players in the world for the previous year, as you made one last year. I hope you find the time to make it this year too. I love going through the lists and tell all my friends about this site too.

JordanPratt1
JordanPratt1

@ConnaB Okay then I'll get started then :P

Ewan MacKenna
Ewan MacKenna

Pat Devlin asks aspiring journalist during after-match interview if he had stuck his fingers in a socket for instance?

Football Pantheon
Football Pantheon

We were thinking that would become an issue. We had to stay true to our formula.system though, and that scored low on influence, quality etc... Think about it another way... would it feel so high-profile if it was from a fourth tier from outside England? Plus, Carlisle got relegated two years later.

Alex Cooper
Alex Cooper

Presumably a typo (or two!) No. 2 Maradona, does not add up to 23!

Shakir Choudhury
Shakir Choudhury

Jimmy Glass' extra time winner to save Carlisle United from conference football......

Daniel Collins
Daniel Collins

Two big one's missing for me: -David May stealing the limelight on the podium after the '99 CL final. -Liam Coyle leaving Carles Puyol on his arse when Derry City played Barcelona at the Brandywell in 2003.

NathanBarnes
NathanBarnes

How about Arsenal's unbeaten run? Just saying..

Manicowl
Manicowl

I'm surprised the match between Red Star Belgrade and Dynamo Zagreb that we're told started the war in the Balkans isn't in there, or would that be classed in the same vein as Heysel, Hillsborough etc...?

adamrhbrown
adamrhbrown

And so, we come to this list. Well...hmmm. Difficult to say really. What makes a great moment is very much more difficult to analyse than the other categories established so far. For what it's worth, I feel that the word needs a stricter definition than what applies here. I mentioned in my email to you that I think a 'moment' should be no more than 5 mins tops, and even that might be overstating it.

Using The Times' Wish You Were There moments as a guide, I have drafted up a list of what I believe to be the 50 Most Iconic English Football TV Events, a word that I feel works better when you want to measure whole matches (or even campaigns) against isolated incidents - as well as acknowledging the influence of broadcasting. On that basis I can't disagree with much of your selection here, though I cannot fathom why such high rankings are bestowed upon each episode of Mourinho and Barca's tit-for-tat just yet.

Also, let me just clarify how surreal as an English fan it is to see Stan Collymore above "They think it's all over" and beg you to reconsider, simply because we cannot afford him to actually see that!

I also strongly disagree with ranking Bergkamp so high. Obviously the goal is of the highest quality, but how can the even more extraordinary - as well as more iconic and more influential - contributions of Cantona, Tardelli and Zidane rank so far down the list in comparison? (I'm not trying to glorify violence, by the way. Just those two examples.)

Re that goal though, I recently came across a New York Times blog post from the 2006 World Cup, reflecting on previous Argentina/Holland games. Although mostly about the 1978 final, Bergkamp's goal obviously gets a mention. Scrolling down to the comments, it amused me greatly to find the first one by an American sports fan, suitably unimpressed! (Though, to be fair, considerably more of his countrymen jumped in to disassociate themselves from such a remark.)

Last thing for now - Maradona's goals vs England should be one entry. The contrast is the real story - an apt metaphor for both the man and the wider culture of his homeland. Plus it just about squeezes into my five minute limit. (Alright, make it 10, then Liverpool's bizarre comeback can still be included as well.)

Meerkat
Meerkat

Fascinating as always. The major omissions for me would be Heysel, Munich, Superga (although these were more 'important' than 'great') and Jimmy Glass '99.I do wish there were more actual "moments" than summaries of important matches, particularly in the top 50. I'd also like to see more moments that transcend football on the pitch alone; for example, Kepto and Gun: in the era of fanzines, phone-ins, supporters' clubs and Fever Pitch, it was clear fans had a voice and influence on the game (of varying levels)...this story (that it was fictitious is irrelevant) and the reaction to it showed how football is universal and can bring anyone together.I don't see why there are 2 moments of the Mourinho vs Barca saga; can these not be distilled into one? Pick the most important and lasting, include a summary of the other? Nice read though

PadraigOHooligan
PadraigOHooligan

A great list. I of course disagree with the placing of many things. For one I would have had Van Basten's goal and the Cruyff turn higher as actual moments, but that's the point of this, a great read. I can't think of any major omissions as of yet but I will return and whinge about something that pops into my head later, you can be sure.

It puts me in mind of the Orbis World Cup 90 Collection binder which was my first introduction to a lot of the moments on the list.

footballistico
footballistico

Great site. No place to include Thuram's two goals against Croatia (world cup 1998 semi-final ) ? It's a good example of an event transcending a player.

Miguel Delaney
Miguel Delaney

It was truly brilliant. But our shortlist ran to the hundreds. Many great moments missed out. What, for example, would you take out to put it in?

jimm1y
jimm1y

great list, iv only 1 problem. you never used jimmy magee's commentary for the maradona goal!

Big Fat Ronaldo
Big Fat Ronaldo

There must be a place for this. Kanu (ex-Inter Milan, Ajax and Arsenal) extraordinary last minute equaliser versus Brazil in the 1996 Olympic semi-final.

In a crowded last minute six yard box, with his team 2-3 down, he flicks the ball up with his back to goal and chips it over the Dida, in one movement

Nigeria was 3-1 down at half time at one stage, Brazil had a clear goal disallowed that would have made it 4-1, Nigeria missed a penalty while it was 3-1, and Kanu eventually scored a sensational Golden Goal to end it in extra time, completely dumbfooling the Brazilian defence before smashing home from 18yards

All this happened before without me mentioning the sheer beauty, and incredible exhibition of skilled and attacking football from both sides.....for the Brazilian team had - Ronaldo da Lima ( one month before THE INCREDIBLE 96/97 season at Barcelona), Rivaldo, Bebeto, Roberto Carlos, the maestro Juninho in his pomp, Flavio Conceiao (Real Madrid), Ze Elias, the great centre back Aldair and Dida in goal.

This set the stage for Nigeria's equally pulsating and dramatic final against the Argentina team, which had - Hernan Crespo, Mattias Almeyda, Diego Simeone, Javier Zanetti, Roberto Ayala, Nestor Sensini, Ariel Ortega, Claudio Lopez,Jose Chamot

Nigeria went behind 5times in both semi final and final and still won the tournament

The Nigeria Brazil game also made it into World Soccer Magazine's 50 greatest matches of all time

And before this, had any team outside Europe or South America won an an International Football tournament??? I doubt

It also inspired the Nigerian national team to record momentous victories over Spain and Bulgaria at France 1998 World Cup, and the Cameroun team to retain the Olympic Football title in 2000 for Africa

It deserves an inclusion

Football Pantheon
Football Pantheon

We were thinking that would become an issue. We had to stay true to our formula.system though, and that scored low on influence, quality etc... Think about it another way... would it feel so high-profile if it was from a fourth tier from outside England? Plus, Carlisle got relegated two years later.

adamabyss
adamabyss

You had better revise this to include Henry's return goal at Arsenal tonight. Absolutely incredible, unprecedented emotional scenes.

MDelaneyST
MDelaneyST moderator

@Meerkat Cheers as ever. The reason we didn't include Heysel, Hillsborough, Munich or Superga is because we didn't want to trivialise or be flippant about tragedies (by including them in such a list in the first place), and we also wanted this to mostly be a 'celebration' of the game, so made a conscious decision to leave such terrible incidents.Re the likes of Fever Pitch, they're simply too hard to quantify. And, again, that's not really the style we were going for. With respect, you're also the first person to suggest that!As for Glass, well the reason it's not included is because it scored low in a few categories (not nature obviously). It didn't really have an influence on the game and, mostly, Carlisle were relegated within a few years!

As for two moments from the Mourinho-Barca saga, well the fact is they were important even apart from the saga: one set the tactical template of the game, the other was one of the landmark, all-time performances.But cheers again! All feedback is welcome!

Meerkat
Meerkat

I'm also not sure how to format comments so paragraph spaces aren't deleted on publication?

adamrhbrown
adamrhbrown

@Meerkat You can't have genuine tragedies on a list of great moments! I would however nominate the rendition of You'll Never Walk Alone before the 1989 FA Cup final (or - as mentioned in the relevant entry - the one performed by AC Milan and Real Madrid fans in that semi final).

MDelaneyST
MDelaneyST moderator

@BenjaminBildeBoelsmand Pearce isn't a bad shout but, consider this: in the 'global game', Baggio's goal against Chile was possibly bigger if we're going to go along those lines. It was his first World Cup game since the miss against Brazil (which, most of all, settled an actual World Cup) and, moreover, he was a much bigger name than Pearce.As for Glass, well the reason it's not included is because it scored low in a few categories (not nature obviously). It didn't really have an influence on the game and, mostly, Carlisle were relegated within a few years!I know what you're saying about the game being at its purest, but it can hardly be described as the game at its "finest"!

Quality, after all, had to be one of our considerations!

adamrhbrown
adamrhbrown

@PadraigOHooligan Yes, I too was surprised to see that anyone would rank Bergkamp ahead of his two countrymen, great goal that it is, especially as Cruyff's turn has come to signify something even beyond the player's abilities. If it's been judged so favourably just because it happened in the last minute I'd say Michael Thomas, Jimmy Glass, and Man Utd vs Bayern all easily beat it for pure drama - and they actually settled the outcomes of whole seasons, not one inconsequential quarter final match.

adamabyss
adamabyss

@footballistico good suggestion. I believe they were the only two goals he ever scored for France. Don't you mean a player transcending an event?

MDelaneyST
MDelaneyST moderator

@adamabyss Well, let's not go nuts! It wouldn't score highly in too many of our criteria like "importance", "impact on history" (although we wouldn't know that for a while).

Golden Ball
Golden Ball

 @MDelaneyST  @Meerkat good decision not to include Hillsborough, Heysel and Munich. Just wondering why King Kennys winner against Brugge in 78 wasnt included. It was significant. Cheers!

Golden Ball
Golden Ball

 @adamrhbrown  @Meerkat The replay against Forest could have been Included as well. And speaking about Liverpool...The 88 season game against Forest, the 5-0 demolition was huge.

BenjaminBildeBoelsmand
BenjaminBildeBoelsmand

@MDelaneyST@BenjaminBildeBoelsmand I probably agree with you on Baggio, even though the screams of Pearce have me in tears every time (and as a dane it's not the national emotions). And with Glass I must respectfully disagree with the decision. To me, it's what football is about.

Once again thanks for the fantastic work you do!

adamabyss
adamabyss

@MDelaneyST It was his 227th goal for them though - a goal that no one ever thought would be scored. And just a few weeks after they unveiled a statue of him. Isn't it even supposed to be bad luck to have a statue of yourself erected while you are still alive (or maybe that's street names, haha)? Evidently it wasn't unlucky for him! He's had a pretty historical impact on the world game though, he was the best player in the world for a couple of years and this is the latest (last?) chapter. Night.