The 100 greatest football moments of all time

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Eusebio North Korea

Eusebio eliminates North Korea on his own, 1966 World Cup

90. Pele nutmegs Eusebio

Benfica 2-5 Santos (4-8 agg), Estadio da Luz
Intercontinental Cup, 11 October 1962

The moment in a tie during which Santos gave the European champions a proper reality check by going 5-0 up in the Stadium of Light, Pele capped a crowning match by hitting a hat-trick and then nutmegging one of his greatest rising rivals. By then, the embarrassment was complete. As was the implication: Brazilian football and its personification, Pele, were unquestionably number-one.

What it meant the king was keeping the throne. Moreover, it led to the spread of the nutmeg – a universal move now (and the ultimate way to embarrass an opposition player) but one that Pele initially popularised in the ’50s and ’60s.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Zico and Flamengo destroy Liverpool, 1981

 

89. Eintracht Frankfurst improbably survive a five-way relegation struggle

Final day: Eintracht Frankfurt 5-1 Kaiserslautern; Stuttgart 1-0 Werder Bremen; Nuremburg 1-2 Freiburg; Bochum 2-3 Hansa Rostock
Bundesliga, 29 May 1999

The moment Which one? With four games left of the 1998-99 German season, Eintracht Frankfurt looked as good as down only to win three games and cut a four-point gap to two.

With 15 minutes left, they were 2-1 up at home to previous champions Kaiserslautern but still striving for another two goals in a situation of so many changing positions and permutations.

At that point, 12th-placed Nuremburg were losing 2-0 to Freiburg but knew they were safe so long as Frankfurt’s score remained the same and Hansa Rostock – who were trailing 2-1 – failed to win at Bochum.

Improbably, both hit two each… only for Nuremburg’s Nikl to themselves strike in the 86th minute and likely stay up on goal difference at the expense of Eintracht.

Except, in the 87th minute, Jan Aage Fjortoft struck for Frankfurt to complete the swing. The difference wasn’t even, well, goal difference. It was goals scored. And Fjortoft had hit one of the most famous in Bundesliga history.

What it meant The most remarkable and riveting relegation scrap in football history.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Cagliari 1990-91; Oldham survive 1992-93; Everton 1993-94; Jimmy Glass 1999

 

88. Collymore closes in… and closes out a classic

Liverpool 4-3 Newcastle United, Anfield
Premier League, 3 April 1996

The moment an exhilarating and incredible – if also error-strewn – game between two title challengers that pulsated from first moment to last. Robbie Fowler scored the opener after two minutes, and Stan Collymore hit the last two minutes into stoppage time. In between, the lead changed hands three times and the ball rapidly went from one end of the pitch to the other much more often, emphasising what a proper helter-skelter game this was. In many ways, it was the ideal high-scoring match: plenty of attacking football, the initiative constantly changing and an awful lot on the line. Of course, it also had a thoroughly appropriate crescendo.

They said

“When people say I’ve underachieved as a player, I’ll point to nights like that. That’s what I was given footballing gifts for: to entertain on nights like that.” Collymore

“We’ll carry on playing this way or I go.” Kevin Keegan

What it meant to a certain extent, this was the game that properly launched the modern Premier League. Certainly, it’s the kind of game the entire brand has been traded on and Sky breathlessly promote – and perhaps naively expect – before every Super Sunday. The day-to-day reality, of course, is often different… as Keegan found out himself. Because, in the context of that actual campaign, the match crystallised the reasons why his Newcastle United would not win the title. While Keegan’s side crashed through games in cavalier fashion, the eventual winners Manchester United closed them out.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Kaiserslautern 7-4 Bayern Munich, 1973; Barcelona 4-3 Valencia, 2001

 

87. The revolution is televised as Don Revie stares down Brian Clough

Calendar TV Studios
English league, 12 September 1974

The moment Over the previous half-decade, Brian Clough’s professional personality had won an unexpected league title for Derby County but also the anger of Don Revie’s Leeds United players. His media personality, meanwhile had inspired similarly contrasting emotions in the British public. On 12 September 1974, all of those strands were brought together in a brilliant, unprecedented, sparkling on-air live debate between Clough and Revie. The subject: Revie’s successor as Leeds boss… Clough – who had only been sacked hours previously.

And that in itself was the appropriate ending to what had been a chaotic, controversial, often-farcical 44 days at Elland Road.

They said

“I’ll not call him Clough, I wouldn’t show him that disrespect.” Revie
“I wanted to do something you hadn’t done.” Clough

“There’s no way you can win it better… we’d only lost four matches.” Revie
“Well then I can only lose three.” Clough

What it meant For author David Peace, the personal duel was one of the driving forces of Clough’s career. Academic Domonic Sandbrook has even compared the exchange to the 1960 US presidential debate between John Kennedy and Richard Nixon, with both men occupying obvious counterparts. Perhaps more concretely, the substantial pay-off from Leeds gave Clough the security and confidence to go to a club like Nottingham Forest with no fear. Moreover, it solidified his reputation as a master of the media – despite the draw the debate is perceived to have been.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Any number of Clough sound bites

 

86. Eusebio knocks out North Korea

Portugal 5-3 North Korea, Goodison Park
World Cup quarter-final, 23 July 1966

The moment Having already knocked out Italy, the 1966 World Cup’s shock team North Korea looked as if they were about to strike twice as they raced into a 3-0 lead against Portugal after 25 minutes. But, as the Europeans looked at each other accusingly, Eusebio only looked at how to make amends. Within moments, he had broken into the box and smashed the ball into the top corner. The striker scored the game’s next three goals – two of them penalties, with the forward himself brought down for one – to give Portugal an astounding win.

They said

“As long as we don’t go four goals down, we’re still in with a chance.” Antonio Simoes

“We were taken completely by surprise… but I had my day.” Eusebio

What it meant That Eusebio definitely overtook Helmut Haller as the 1966 World Cup’s top scorer. But the exact nature of the revival also confirmed the striker’s status as the tournament’s stand-out player and Portugal as its most exhilarating team. North Korea, however, had set the template for admirable losers. It also marks only the second time in World Cup a team has come back from 3-0 down.

 

85. Dalglish resigns

English league, 22 February 1991

The moment The result exhilarated and entertained many people. But not, apparently, Kenny Dalglish. His Liverpool side had just drawn 4-4 with Everton in a remarkable game at Goodison Park, the home side coming from behind four times. But, resting his arm on the dugout after the game, he only carried a bewildered look on his face. His players thought it was because of the kamikaze nature of Liverpool’s defending. And, in the dressing room after the game, he had given no indication it was anything other than a setback to be overcome.

Then, two days later at training, the Liverpool squad were oddly told to meet in the dressing room. Dalglish simply walked in and said he was leaving.
The squad sat in silence. Which was much like the reaction of the general public once Dalglish staged a press conference later that day.
Incredibly, the man most associated with Liverpool and the majority of their victories throughout the last two decades was severing his attachment to the club.

They said

“OK, let’s go training now.” Ronnie Moran after Dalglish’s announcement.

“No one had a clue it was coming or why he’d done it.” Ian Rush

“You could have knocked each and every one of the Liverpool players down with a feather.” Ray Houghton

“It’s just really a result of 20 years involvement in football at a very high level… I’ve been pushed to the limit.” Dalglish

“He gave so much to relatives of the Hillsborough victims and, eventually, it took its toll.” Houghton

“After we took the lead for the final time I knew I had to make a change to shore things up at the back. I could see what needed to be done and what would happen if I didn’t. I didn’t act on it. That was the moment I knew I was shattered. I needed to get away from the pressure.” Dalglish, years later

What it meant Quite a lot. On a football level, it eventually led Liverpool to lose the 1991 league title race to Arsenal and – in the long-term – to lose their place at the top of English football. Graeme Souness soon took over and greatly quickened what had been a gradual decline.

On a human level, however, Dalglish almost personified the underappreciated strain that followed the pain of Heysel and Hillsborough. Football may have moved on. But many involved couldn’t. Not least Dalglish. It remains one of the most shock departures in the game’s history.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Bela Guttman leaves Benfica 1962; Andy Cole leaves Newcastle 1995

 

84. West Germany weave magic at Wembley

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qw7tG6d6qX8

England 1-3 West Germany, Wembley
Euro 72 quarter-finals, 29 April 1972

The moment West Germany take to the Wembley pitch six years after 1966 and duly take England apart. With the Bayern core in brilliant, belligerent form and Gunter Netzer effortlessly and endlessly switching positions with Franz Beckenbauer, England have little answer to the effervescence of the German attack. Although Franny Lee equalises Netzer’s swashbuckling opener in the 77th minute, the Germans merely illustrate the character that would epitomise them by going on to score another two in the closing 13. Relatively close though the score may have been, there was a distinct gulf in class between the teams.

They said

“The second most famous 90 minutes of Germany’s history.” Uli Hesse

“Football from the year 2000.” L’Equipe

What it meant Germany’s first ever win on English soil but, most of all, a shift of football’s tectonic plates and the beginning of a dynasty. The Germans would surge to a scintillating Euro 72 win and begin the most consistent series of tournament performance in history. The nucleus of that side would do on to do the double by winning the World Cup and then almost complete a treble before losing the 76 final to Czechoslovakia.

The style of the win, however, would also tell the world that there was Total Football beyond Amsterdam.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Sergio Ramos’s goal v Denmark, 2007

 

83. Pivatelli takes out Coluna… and heralds the era of Catenaccio

Milan 2-1 Benfica, Wembley
European Cup final, 22 May 1963

The moment It’s the 57th minute and Benfica are on course for their third consecutive European Cup thanks to Eusebio’s early goal. Exhilarating and open, the Portuguese were causing all manner of problems for the more pragmatic Italians. But, suddenly, Milan catch Benfica out in midfield and striker Altafini is allowed a completely clear run to goal: 1-1. Immediately after the restart, Benfica attempt to build another attack only for Giovanni Pivatelli – charged by manager Nereo Rocco with man-marking Mario Coluna – to leave the number-10 hobbling after an abrasive challenge. Since substitutions are still to be introduced to the game, Benfica’s captain is left to limp around the field – but to absolutely no effect. Without their creative hub and primary playmaker, the Portuguese are unable to open gaps in Milan’s sturdy defence while simultaneously getting stretched. Eight minutes later, the Italians maximise the advantage as Altafini scores another breakaway goal. With Milan holding on, it was to be the last of the game.

They said

“It was a shame because our great captain couldn’t do anything for the team and so Milan made the most of the opportunity. Milan made the most of the opportunity on the counter-attack.” Eusebio

“Milan were up to all the cynical stuff – pulling your hair, spitting, treading on your toes.” Andy Nelson on Ipswich’s second-round defeat to Milan in the same season.

What it meant That Benfica’s run had ended and Catenaccio’s had started. The Milanese clubs – both practitioners of the philosophy – would win three of the next six finals. Moreover, the temporary dominance of a more defensive style would also encapsulate a shift right across the game.

In 1958, the average goals per game at the World Cup had been 3.6. Benfica, Real Madrid and even Milan themselves would maintain that kind of ratio in the early years of the European Cup.

By 1966, however, the average had dropped to more moderate, modern-style level of 2.6 as so many more teams shifted to four at the back.

The football world had lost some of its innocence. And the loss of Coluna had marked a clear turning point.

Similar moments that didn’t make it Rudi Voller gets injured for Werder Bremen in the 1985-86 title race; Pavel Nedved is injured against Greece in the Euro 2004 semi-final

 

82. Basile Boli completes Bernad Tapie’s dream… and begins his nightmare

Olympique Marseille 1-0 Milan, Olympiastadion Munich
Champions League final, 26 May 1993

The moment After 38 barren years and four failed finals, a French club finally had the chance to bring the Champions League trophy back to the country that first devised the competition. Except, against a team as formidable as Milan, something special was going to be required.

Defender Basile Boli seemed to provide it in the 43rd minute as he evaded Frank Rijkaard to superbly head in a corner.

It soon became apparent, however, that club president Tapie had provided something extra still. Having pumped a fortune into the club over the previous half-decade in a desperate obsession with lifting the European Cup, the ex-government minister was clearly concerned that even that wasn’t enough against the might of Milan.

So, in the week before the final, Marseille player Jean-Jacques Eydelie approached Valenciennes players Jacques Glassmann, Jorge Burruchaga and Chistophe Robert asking them to “ease off” in a league fixture four days beforehand. Not only would it allow Marseille to effortlessly seal the title, it would spare them any injuries or stress ahead of the crucial Champions League.

Three weeks after Marseille’s emotional European victory, detectives dug up an envelope containing 250,000 francs in the garden of Robert’s aunt. He later admitted to accepting the bribe.

They said

“It was not the happiest period of French football.” Arsene Wenger

What it meant Marseille became the only French club to win the European Cup but also the only competition winners to be stripped of a league title and eventually demoted. The scandal cast suspicion on all of Marseille’s Tapie-purchased success and altered the dynamics of French football. Perhaps fittingly, the final also ended the first official “Champions League” season, appropriately foreshadowing the competition’s obsession and emphasis on money.

 

81. Wolves overturn Honved… and European football history

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDWKcuQPyuQ

Wolves 3-2 Honved, Molineux
Friendly, 13 December 1954

The moment In the mid-50s, English football wasn’t exactly feeling secure in itself. Over the previous 18 months, its national team had twice been embarrassed by Hungary before getting knocked out of the 1954 World Cup in the quarter-finals by world champions Uruguay.

Having had their reality drastically realigned, it was hardly surprising that some sectors of the public would get carried away by the ambience of floodlights and live TV as Wolves took on Spartak Moscow and Honved in a set of prestige friendlies. Not to mention the action.

After the English champions had beaten the Russians, it initially seemed like the Hungarian side – featuring Ferenc Puskas, Sandor Kocsis and Zoltan Czibor among a number of national team players – would reassert their superiority as they raced into a 2-0 lead.

Except Wolves showed the kind of graft that had granted them such an elevated position in the English game. First, Hancock hit a penalty just after half-time to amp up the electric atmosphere. But Wolves still had to wait.

Until, 15 minutes from the end, Swinborne headed home an equaliser. Then, within 100 seconds, all of Shorthouse, Smith and Wilshaw combined to set up Swinborne for the winner.

Emboldened by the result, the Daily Mail declared in an infamous headline that Wolves were “Champions of the World”.

That only energised one of their foreign counterparts though. Disconcerted by the suggestion that a team could be the greatest despite not even granting a return game, L’Equipe writer Gabriel Hanot proposed an all-encompassing continental competition.

They said

“If the English are so sure about their hegemony in football, then this is the time to create a European tournament.” Hanot

“Too many wogs and dagoes!” Alan Hardaker offers his reasons for opposing the tournament

What it meant That Europe would have a much more decisive and definitive way of declaring its champions. Although Hanot initially proposed a giant round-robin (and sowed the seeds of a future Super League), he altered his proposal to a knock-out when the clubs felt it would require too many fixtures. In the same era as a political union was formed, Europe was to be unified in another – possibly more lasting – way.

 

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96 comments
FrankLovett
FrankLovett

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mink
mink

Gerrie Muhren 1973 Real Madrid-Ajax 0-1 "keepie-uppie"

 

thefootballfan
thefootballfan

u missed bulgaria win over germany in the world cup.

thefootballfan
thefootballfan

what about did it cross the line this time for england

ApoorvGupta
ApoorvGupta

I expected to see a list of the best players in the world for the previous year, as you made one last year. I hope you find the time to make it this year too. I love going through the lists and tell all my friends about this site too.

JordanPratt1
JordanPratt1

@ConnaB Okay then I'll get started then :P

Ewan MacKenna
Ewan MacKenna

Pat Devlin asks aspiring journalist during after-match interview if he had stuck his fingers in a socket for instance?

Football Pantheon
Football Pantheon

We were thinking that would become an issue. We had to stay true to our formula.system though, and that scored low on influence, quality etc... Think about it another way... would it feel so high-profile if it was from a fourth tier from outside England? Plus, Carlisle got relegated two years later.

Alex Cooper
Alex Cooper

Presumably a typo (or two!) No. 2 Maradona, does not add up to 23!

Shakir Choudhury
Shakir Choudhury

Jimmy Glass' extra time winner to save Carlisle United from conference football......

Daniel Collins
Daniel Collins

Two big one's missing for me: -David May stealing the limelight on the podium after the '99 CL final. -Liam Coyle leaving Carles Puyol on his arse when Derry City played Barcelona at the Brandywell in 2003.

NathanBarnes
NathanBarnes

How about Arsenal's unbeaten run? Just saying..

Manicowl
Manicowl

I'm surprised the match between Red Star Belgrade and Dynamo Zagreb that we're told started the war in the Balkans isn't in there, or would that be classed in the same vein as Heysel, Hillsborough etc...?

adamrhbrown
adamrhbrown

And so, we come to this list. Well...hmmm. Difficult to say really. What makes a great moment is very much more difficult to analyse than the other categories established so far. For what it's worth, I feel that the word needs a stricter definition than what applies here. I mentioned in my email to you that I think a 'moment' should be no more than 5 mins tops, and even that might be overstating it.

Using The Times' Wish You Were There moments as a guide, I have drafted up a list of what I believe to be the 50 Most Iconic English Football TV Events, a word that I feel works better when you want to measure whole matches (or even campaigns) against isolated incidents - as well as acknowledging the influence of broadcasting. On that basis I can't disagree with much of your selection here, though I cannot fathom why such high rankings are bestowed upon each episode of Mourinho and Barca's tit-for-tat just yet.

Also, let me just clarify how surreal as an English fan it is to see Stan Collymore above "They think it's all over" and beg you to reconsider, simply because we cannot afford him to actually see that!

I also strongly disagree with ranking Bergkamp so high. Obviously the goal is of the highest quality, but how can the even more extraordinary - as well as more iconic and more influential - contributions of Cantona, Tardelli and Zidane rank so far down the list in comparison? (I'm not trying to glorify violence, by the way. Just those two examples.)

Re that goal though, I recently came across a New York Times blog post from the 2006 World Cup, reflecting on previous Argentina/Holland games. Although mostly about the 1978 final, Bergkamp's goal obviously gets a mention. Scrolling down to the comments, it amused me greatly to find the first one by an American sports fan, suitably unimpressed! (Though, to be fair, considerably more of his countrymen jumped in to disassociate themselves from such a remark.)

Last thing for now - Maradona's goals vs England should be one entry. The contrast is the real story - an apt metaphor for both the man and the wider culture of his homeland. Plus it just about squeezes into my five minute limit. (Alright, make it 10, then Liverpool's bizarre comeback can still be included as well.)

Meerkat
Meerkat

Fascinating as always. The major omissions for me would be Heysel, Munich, Superga (although these were more 'important' than 'great') and Jimmy Glass '99.I do wish there were more actual "moments" than summaries of important matches, particularly in the top 50. I'd also like to see more moments that transcend football on the pitch alone; for example, Kepto and Gun: in the era of fanzines, phone-ins, supporters' clubs and Fever Pitch, it was clear fans had a voice and influence on the game (of varying levels)...this story (that it was fictitious is irrelevant) and the reaction to it showed how football is universal and can bring anyone together.I don't see why there are 2 moments of the Mourinho vs Barca saga; can these not be distilled into one? Pick the most important and lasting, include a summary of the other? Nice read though

PadraigOHooligan
PadraigOHooligan

A great list. I of course disagree with the placing of many things. For one I would have had Van Basten's goal and the Cruyff turn higher as actual moments, but that's the point of this, a great read. I can't think of any major omissions as of yet but I will return and whinge about something that pops into my head later, you can be sure.

It puts me in mind of the Orbis World Cup 90 Collection binder which was my first introduction to a lot of the moments on the list.

footballistico
footballistico

Great site. No place to include Thuram's two goals against Croatia (world cup 1998 semi-final ) ? It's a good example of an event transcending a player.

Miguel Delaney
Miguel Delaney

It was truly brilliant. But our shortlist ran to the hundreds. Many great moments missed out. What, for example, would you take out to put it in?

jimm1y
jimm1y

great list, iv only 1 problem. you never used jimmy magee's commentary for the maradona goal!

Big Fat Ronaldo
Big Fat Ronaldo

There must be a place for this. Kanu (ex-Inter Milan, Ajax and Arsenal) extraordinary last minute equaliser versus Brazil in the 1996 Olympic semi-final.

In a crowded last minute six yard box, with his team 2-3 down, he flicks the ball up with his back to goal and chips it over the Dida, in one movement

Nigeria was 3-1 down at half time at one stage, Brazil had a clear goal disallowed that would have made it 4-1, Nigeria missed a penalty while it was 3-1, and Kanu eventually scored a sensational Golden Goal to end it in extra time, completely dumbfooling the Brazilian defence before smashing home from 18yards

All this happened before without me mentioning the sheer beauty, and incredible exhibition of skilled and attacking football from both sides.....for the Brazilian team had - Ronaldo da Lima ( one month before THE INCREDIBLE 96/97 season at Barcelona), Rivaldo, Bebeto, Roberto Carlos, the maestro Juninho in his pomp, Flavio Conceiao (Real Madrid), Ze Elias, the great centre back Aldair and Dida in goal.

This set the stage for Nigeria's equally pulsating and dramatic final against the Argentina team, which had - Hernan Crespo, Mattias Almeyda, Diego Simeone, Javier Zanetti, Roberto Ayala, Nestor Sensini, Ariel Ortega, Claudio Lopez,Jose Chamot

Nigeria went behind 5times in both semi final and final and still won the tournament

The Nigeria Brazil game also made it into World Soccer Magazine's 50 greatest matches of all time

And before this, had any team outside Europe or South America won an an International Football tournament??? I doubt

It also inspired the Nigerian national team to record momentous victories over Spain and Bulgaria at France 1998 World Cup, and the Cameroun team to retain the Olympic Football title in 2000 for Africa

It deserves an inclusion

Football Pantheon
Football Pantheon

We were thinking that would become an issue. We had to stay true to our formula.system though, and that scored low on influence, quality etc... Think about it another way... would it feel so high-profile if it was from a fourth tier from outside England? Plus, Carlisle got relegated two years later.

adamabyss
adamabyss

You had better revise this to include Henry's return goal at Arsenal tonight. Absolutely incredible, unprecedented emotional scenes.

MDelaneyST
MDelaneyST moderator

@Meerkat Cheers as ever. The reason we didn't include Heysel, Hillsborough, Munich or Superga is because we didn't want to trivialise or be flippant about tragedies (by including them in such a list in the first place), and we also wanted this to mostly be a 'celebration' of the game, so made a conscious decision to leave such terrible incidents.Re the likes of Fever Pitch, they're simply too hard to quantify. And, again, that's not really the style we were going for. With respect, you're also the first person to suggest that!As for Glass, well the reason it's not included is because it scored low in a few categories (not nature obviously). It didn't really have an influence on the game and, mostly, Carlisle were relegated within a few years!

As for two moments from the Mourinho-Barca saga, well the fact is they were important even apart from the saga: one set the tactical template of the game, the other was one of the landmark, all-time performances.But cheers again! All feedback is welcome!

Meerkat
Meerkat

I'm also not sure how to format comments so paragraph spaces aren't deleted on publication?

adamrhbrown
adamrhbrown

@Meerkat You can't have genuine tragedies on a list of great moments! I would however nominate the rendition of You'll Never Walk Alone before the 1989 FA Cup final (or - as mentioned in the relevant entry - the one performed by AC Milan and Real Madrid fans in that semi final).

MDelaneyST
MDelaneyST moderator

@BenjaminBildeBoelsmand Pearce isn't a bad shout but, consider this: in the 'global game', Baggio's goal against Chile was possibly bigger if we're going to go along those lines. It was his first World Cup game since the miss against Brazil (which, most of all, settled an actual World Cup) and, moreover, he was a much bigger name than Pearce.As for Glass, well the reason it's not included is because it scored low in a few categories (not nature obviously). It didn't really have an influence on the game and, mostly, Carlisle were relegated within a few years!I know what you're saying about the game being at its purest, but it can hardly be described as the game at its "finest"!

Quality, after all, had to be one of our considerations!

adamrhbrown
adamrhbrown

@PadraigOHooligan Yes, I too was surprised to see that anyone would rank Bergkamp ahead of his two countrymen, great goal that it is, especially as Cruyff's turn has come to signify something even beyond the player's abilities. If it's been judged so favourably just because it happened in the last minute I'd say Michael Thomas, Jimmy Glass, and Man Utd vs Bayern all easily beat it for pure drama - and they actually settled the outcomes of whole seasons, not one inconsequential quarter final match.

adamabyss
adamabyss

@footballistico good suggestion. I believe they were the only two goals he ever scored for France. Don't you mean a player transcending an event?

MDelaneyST
MDelaneyST moderator

@adamabyss Well, let's not go nuts! It wouldn't score highly in too many of our criteria like "importance", "impact on history" (although we wouldn't know that for a while).

Golden Ball
Golden Ball

 @MDelaneyST  @Meerkat good decision not to include Hillsborough, Heysel and Munich. Just wondering why King Kennys winner against Brugge in 78 wasnt included. It was significant. Cheers!

Golden Ball
Golden Ball

 @adamrhbrown  @Meerkat The replay against Forest could have been Included as well. And speaking about Liverpool...The 88 season game against Forest, the 5-0 demolition was huge.

BenjaminBildeBoelsmand
BenjaminBildeBoelsmand

@MDelaneyST@BenjaminBildeBoelsmand I probably agree with you on Baggio, even though the screams of Pearce have me in tears every time (and as a dane it's not the national emotions). And with Glass I must respectfully disagree with the decision. To me, it's what football is about.

Once again thanks for the fantastic work you do!

adamabyss
adamabyss

@MDelaneyST It was his 227th goal for them though - a goal that no one ever thought would be scored. And just a few weeks after they unveiled a statue of him. Isn't it even supposed to be bad luck to have a statue of yourself erected while you are still alive (or maybe that's street names, haha)? Evidently it wasn't unlucky for him! He's had a pretty historical impact on the world game though, he was the best player in the world for a couple of years and this is the latest (last?) chapter. Night.